After love with. This stage is called the frustration

After fightingthrough the emotional challenges of culture shock, someone will finally reach thelast phase which is called the acceptance stage. At this stage the person nowaccepts the different aspects of the new culture, and considers it their home (At Home in Germany, p 10). There is a now a level ofintegration, where they feel and see themselves as a part of the new society.

Duringthis stage they begin to feel as though they can reach their full potential inthis country (https://www.gringotree.com/understanding-4-phases-culture-shock/).When someone reaches this phase, the aspects of the new culture which aredifferent to their home culture no longer affect them in a negative way. Theydon’t feel as though they completely understand everything about the newculture, but they accept that fact and feel at peace learning new things aboutthe culture gradually.   4thStage : The Acceptance Stage After going throughthe frustration stage, things start to get better overtime.

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This stage iscalled the adjustment stage, and is a gradual shift from feeling frustrated tofeeling at ease and accepting the new culture. The person becomes more familiarwith the thinking and values of the new culture. They begin to pick up onsignals and  are able to better read thenew culture. During this stage, people will branch out and make new friends.

They start feeling more comfortable again, and often start preferring some ofthe aspects of their new culture over their home culture. There are lessemotional reactions to the new culture, and people begin thinking more clearand learn deeper about the culture. They now are able to appreciate thedifferent ways and approaches to doing things (https://www.princeton.

edu/oip/practical-matters/Cultural-Adjustment.pdf).The person starts to appreciate the new culture again, and will beginidentifying their self with the culture. They feel as though they are a part ofthe new culture, and will regain the confidence they may have lost in theprevious stage.

It is sometimes possible that feelings of pride for the newculture may result in seeing your home culture in a negative view.  3rdStage : The Adjustment Stage Once someone has reached the end of the honeymoon phase, they begin tosee everything a little bit more clearly. This is when they begin to notice thenegative aspects of the culture they previously felt so in love with. Thisstage is called the frustration stage, and includes feelings of homesick,annoyance, and sadness. During the frustration stage, the novelty of the newculture begins to wear off. Someone who was previously focused on theinteresting aspects of the new culture, will suddenly shift their focus to the differencesbetween the new culture and their home culture. They often feel helpless andfrustrated, and the small differences in the two cultures begin to feel likemajor hardships.

It is at this point of culture shock that most people will setout on a search for familiar activities, food, and people from their homeculture (https://www.princeton.edu/oip/practical-matters/Cultural-Adjustment.pdf).At this stage people begin experiencing difficulties with the language,friends, housing, and schoolwork. These difficulties lead to feelings offrustration and resentment.

Tasks that would be considered little andeffortless in the person’s home culture, become large challenges in the newculture. After feeling so great during the honeymoon phase, the person has sethigh standards and expectations. When these expectations are no longer beingmet, they begin to feel let down and disappointed (https://www.

squaremouth.com/travel-advice/the-four-stages-of-culture-shock/).They start to question why certain things are done differently, and miss thecustoms of their home culture. The time that it will take for someone to moveout of the frustration stage will vary, depending on the person. It can beexhausting to go through this stage, and takes a lot of strength and patientsto succeed.  2ndStage : The Frustration Stage For most people, moving to a new country is exciting and will initiallypromote positive feelings. During the honeymoon phase, the person will beintrigued by all of the aspects of the new culture, whether they are similar ordifferent from their home culture.

They feel motivated and eager to learn aboutthe new language, culture, and ways of life. During this stage the person willfeel as if they could handle anything, and do not foresee any challenges orissues with adjusting to the new culture. (https://www.princeton.edu/oip/practical-matters/Cultural-Adjustment.pdf).

There is often a sense of infatuation being felt for their new surroundings,the new people, language, and food. They will feel as though the decision tomove to this culture was a great decision. (https://medium.com/global-perspectives/the-4-stages-of-culture-shock-a79957726164).

Someone in the honeymoon phase will feel eager to try new things, and is openminded to the new way of living. Even though this stage of culture shock isexciting and enjoyable, it is unrealistic for someone to stay in this mindsetforever. As the honeymoon phase approaches an end, the person then begins thefrustration stage of culture shock. 1stStage : Honeymoon PhaseThe4 Stages of Culture ShockLiving abroad can be arewarding experience, opening up the world and presenting many amazing opportunities.It pushes people out of their comfort zone, boosts confidence, and teaches manyimportant life lessons. Despite these benefits, there also comes some greatchallenges that come with moving abroad. These challenges include feeling lost,loneliness, helplessness, dependency, and sadness. Culture Shock is defined as “the feeling ofdisorientation experienced by someone when they are suddenly subjected to anunfamiliar culture, way of life, or set of attitudes” (Oxford Dictionary).

Everyone experiences culture shockin a different way, and takes a different amount of time to go through thepredictable stages of culture shock (At Home inGermany, pp 9-10). The four predictable stages of experiencing cultureshock include the honeymoon phase, the frustration stage, the adjustment stage,and the acceptance stage (At Home in Germany, p 10).Once someone moves to a new country, this process begins with positive emotionstowards the new culture. During the honeymoon phase everything about the cultureseems extremely interesting and exciting, and the negative aspects of theculture are not noticed.

Once someone has spent a long enough time in aculture, this excitement wears of, thus leading into the frustration stage. Duringthis stage, the person begins to notice the negative aspects of the culturethey are living in. This is when the feelings of homesick and depression maykick in. This is the hardest stage to get through, but once someone hassucceeded through this stage, things begin to get better.

Next comes theadjustment stage, where the person begins to learn the ways of the new cultureand adapt to their surroundings. This process takes some time, but eventuallyleads to the acceptance stage. In this stage the person feels at ease andaccepts the culture they are living in. It does not always mean that theyunderstand everything, but they feel alright not understanding everything.

Althoughthis can be a tough process, in the end it is rewarding and teaches someone manythings about their self. International students, who have moved abroad to study,can be considerably affected by culture shock. This paper will discuss the differentstages of culture shock that someone may experience, and address the most effectiveways to alleviate these symptoms. (https://medium.com/global-perspectives/the-4-stages-of-culture-shock-a79957726164)