Debs, are ran by private organizations these schools can

Debs, Mira C.  “Journal of Montessori Research: Racial and Economic Diversity in U.S. Public Montessori Schools” 2016, Vol 2, Issue 2.            Racial and Economic Diversity in U.

S. Public Montessori Schools explains how these types of schools have spread quickly throughout United States but are still facing a diversity problem in racial and economic. When looking at this article it will show that in some instances is has become difficult to make it easier in creating a diverse student body population.            The abstract explains that using an empirical approach to data research has strengths and challenges when it comes to student population that are not segregated but working toward making it accessible to all students.

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The abstract also asks the question what population of students can these schools serve?  Debs uses 300 whole school; public Montessori programs open in 2012-2013 that uses the Montessori Method.            The reason for the creation of the Montessori school programs which started in the 60’s its purpose was to combat desegregation initiatives. It also explains that the Montessori Method started in the 70’s in Cincinnati, Ohio and spread rapidly throughout the United States.            There is a primary concern in the Montessori community felt that these school programs were leading to racial segregation because White and more advantage students were able to use the school choice to leave the traditional public schools. Montessori schools suddenly were in danger of not being able to represent             racial diversity.

            There was an initial research which attempted to document the racial diversity using selected samples of public Montessori schools. There was no direct measurement of   the entire Montessori programs throughout the United States.                          Researchers of school choice joined in and explained the difference between the impact of diversity in various kinds of choices. Magnets schools are part of school choice programs they were established to prevent racial segregation in urban areas. Charter schools which are tuition-free schools chartered by the state but are ran by private organizations these schools can be started by any group looking for an alternative to traditional education. This gave this research another question to be answered: How does the racial and economic diversity of charter schools Montessori differ from that of district and magnet Montessori schools?The methodology used was sampling Debs had to find a way to measure student racial ethnic and socioeconomic diversity in public Montessori schools nationwide, a  data base was designed called the American Public Montessori Historical data set  which covered four primary data sources (a) the 1987-2013 National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) data on public schools (b) the 2014 NCMPS All Montessori Census (c) the 2005 Public Montessori directory, and (d) the 1993 MPSC directory.Debs then created a subgroup of 470 public Montessori schools opened in 2012 -2013.

The 470 public Montessori programs were either whole- schools program and partial programs. She dropped 170 partial programs and concentrated on the 300 whole-schools for the research.The analysis was able to answer both questions the total diversity of public Montessori schools as a sector by calculating the number and percentage of two key categories for each school and district: (a) students of color and (b) FRL-eligible students.   The second question pertained to FRL and student-of-color enrollment differences between charter Montessori and district/magnet Montessori schools.

Debs calculated the mean, standard deviation, and standard error for each group, charter, or district/magnet, its concentration of students of color and FRL-eligible students. The findings for whole school Montessori Sample was as follows 300 whole school public Montessori schools located in 36 states and the District of Columbia. The states with the largest number of whole-school Montessori programs were Arizona (30 schools) California (24 schools), and Wisconsin (21 schools). Urban public Montessori schools made up 47% of the sample.

There were 135 magnet/district schools (45%) and 165 charter schools (55%). In 2012-2013, the average school size was 315 students.The two categories used Racial and Economic Diversity of the Public Montessori Sector, Racial and Economic Diversity in District/Magnet and Charter Montessori Schools. These categories were very detailed explanations to the research