Eugene father’s Irish Catholicism belief. Shortly before his seventh

Eugene Gladstone O’Neill or mostcommonly known as Eugene O’Neill was born on October 16, 1888, in the ‘Barrett House,a family-style hotel in New York, in an Irish family. His father, James O’Neillwas a successful touring actor during the last quarter of the nineteenthcentury whose most famous role was in in a stage adaptation of the AlexandreDumas père novel, the Count of Monte Cristo. His mother, Mary Ellen “Ella” Quinlan,travelled with her husband back and forth across the country settling down temporarilyto give birth to her three sons: James Jr., Edmund, and then Eugene. O’Neillfaced a challenging childhood as his mother developed anaddiction to morphine. Her first introduction with the drug was during aparticular difficult childbirth with the intent of helping her get through. Shortly,after Eugene’s birth, his father continued to do his role in The Count of MonteCristo but this time in a touring production.

 EugeneO’Neill spent much of his early life on the road with his father. His earlychildhood was spent with him hovering between hotel rooms, in the backstage andon trains and the influence of his father’s Irish Catholicism belief. Shortly beforehis seventh birthday, he was sent to a boarding school in Bronx called St.

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Aloysius Academy for Boys where he spent years receiving a strict Catholicupbringing. During summer, he stayed at his family’s only permanent residencecalled the “Monte Cristo Cottage” that sat beside and overlooking the ThamesRiver in New London, Connecticut.  Inthe year 1900, he came back to New York City and studied at the De La SalleInstitute for two years. Afterward, he attended the Betts Academy in Stamford,Connecticut. In 1900, he then attended Princeton University for a year butafter which left following his suspension that was either due to misbehaviouror defiance, short attendance or his uninterest in his studies and waseventually kicked out which he later deemed as the start of his real learningin “life experience”.

For the next six years he led an aimless and negligentlife on the banks of New York City, Liverpool and Buenos Aires. He went onseveral sea voyages, ran around town with his brother James and soon became analcoholic that he even made an attempt to end his life. He had a short-livedmarriage to Kathleen Jenkins, who gave him a son he named Eugene O’Neill Jr.                        At the young age of twenty-four, he held a job with theNew London Telegraph as a reporter and at the same time a contributor to thenewspaper’s poetry column. However, a few months after, he was diagnosed with tuberculosisand was confined to the Gaylord Farm Sanitarium in Wallingford, Connecticut forsix months during the years 1912 to 1913 to undergo treatment.              After his recovery – in which he called it his “rebirth” –he found his calling as a playwright and began to write plays to which the eventsthat had happened to his life prior to confinement in the sanatorium was manifestedin his classic play entitled, “Long Day’s Journey into Night”. He found inspirationfrom European dramatists such as August Strindberg. His first attempts in writingwere awkward melodramas about prostitutes, derelicts, and lonely sailors withthe that tackles about God’s injustice to man which have been the topics andcharacters of this province’s novels but were not considered as appropriatesubjects to be presented in an American stage.

 Inthe year 1914, he enrolled in a writing class at the well-known Harvard Universityafter a theatre critic persuaded his father.  He studied under the tutelage of ProfessorGeorge Pierce Baker in his infamous playwriting course in dramatic techniques butsoon dropped out after completing it.  O’Neillmade his first appearance as a playwright in the summer of 1916 in the quiet fishing village of Provincetown,Massachusetts where a group of youngwriters and painters had launched an experimental theatre and thus, resultingto his association with the group ‘Provincetown Players’ which later formed thePlaywrights’ Theatre in Greenwich Village. His one-act sea play entitled BoundEast for Cardiff was produced in a tiny, dilapidated playhouse on adockyard. Later that year, on November 3, 1916, Bound East for Cardiff and O’Neill debuted in New York as thegroup’s first big break. And for the next few years, his contributions elevatedthe group’s reputation.  O’Neillalso made a second attempt for love when he married Agnes Boulton, a fellowwriter, and the couple was blessed with two children, a son named Shane and adaughter named Oona. All his one-act sea plays, along with a number of hislesser efforts, and a few others were produced by the group in their theatresfrom the years 1916 to 1920.

 Hisfirst full-length play, Beyond the Horizon, was produced in the Morosco Theaterin Broadway in February 2, 1920. It took the theatrical world by a storm as itharvested great compliments from the audiences and stunned the critics with itstragic realism that won O’Neill his very first Pulitzer Prize for Drama andbrought him to the attention of a wider theatre public – both in the UnitedStates and abroad.             Later that year, his first major hit, Emperor Jones, wasperformed in Broadway. The play made indirect reference to that year’sdebatable subject for the presidential election, the US occupation of Haiti.Eugene Gladstone O’Neill or mostcommonly known as Eugene O’Neill was born on October 16, 1888, in the ‘Barrett House,a family-style hotel in New York, in an Irish family.

His father, James O’Neillwas a successful touring actor during the last quarter of the nineteenthcentury whose most famous role was in in a stage adaptation of the AlexandreDumas père novel, the Count of Monte Cristo. His mother, Mary Ellen “Ella” Quinlan,travelled with her husband back and forth across the country settling down temporarilyto give birth to her three sons: James Jr., Edmund, and then Eugene. O’Neillfaced a challenging childhood as his mother developed anaddiction to morphine. Her first introduction with the drug was during aparticular difficult childbirth with the intent of helping her get through. Shortly,after Eugene’s birth, his father continued to do his role in The Count of MonteCristo but this time in a touring production.

 EugeneO’Neill spent much of his early life on the road with his father. His earlychildhood was spent with him hovering between hotel rooms, in the backstage andon trains and the influence of his father’s Irish Catholicism belief. Shortly beforehis seventh birthday, he was sent to a boarding school in Bronx called St.

Aloysius Academy for Boys where he spent years receiving a strict Catholicupbringing. During summer, he stayed at his family’s only permanent residencecalled the “Monte Cristo Cottage” that sat beside and overlooking the ThamesRiver in New London, Connecticut.  Inthe year 1900, he came back to New York City and studied at the De La SalleInstitute for two years. Afterward, he attended the Betts Academy in Stamford,Connecticut. In 1900, he then attended Princeton University for a year butafter which left following his suspension that was either due to misbehaviouror defiance, short attendance or his uninterest in his studies and waseventually kicked out which he later deemed as the start of his real learningin “life experience”. For the next six years he led an aimless and negligentlife on the banks of New York City, Liverpool and Buenos Aires.

He went onseveral sea voyages, ran around town with his brother James and soon became analcoholic that he even made an attempt to end his life. He had a short-livedmarriage to Kathleen Jenkins, who gave him a son he named Eugene O’Neill Jr.                        At the young age of twenty-four, he held a job with theNew London Telegraph as a reporter and at the same time a contributor to thenewspaper’s poetry column. However, a few months after, he was diagnosed with tuberculosisand was confined to the Gaylord Farm Sanitarium in Wallingford, Connecticut forsix months during the years 1912 to 1913 to undergo treatment.              After his recovery – in which he called it his “rebirth” –he found his calling as a playwright and began to write plays to which the eventsthat had happened to his life prior to confinement in the sanatorium was manifestedin his classic play entitled, “Long Day’s Journey into Night”. He found inspirationfrom European dramatists such as August Strindberg. His first attempts in writingwere awkward melodramas about prostitutes, derelicts, and lonely sailors withthe that tackles about God’s injustice to man which have been the topics andcharacters of this province’s novels but were not considered as appropriatesubjects to be presented in an American stage. Inthe year 1914, he enrolled in a writing class at the well-known Harvard Universityafter a theatre critic persuaded his father.

 He studied under the tutelage of ProfessorGeorge Pierce Baker in his infamous playwriting course in dramatic techniques butsoon dropped out after completing it.  O’Neillmade his first appearance as a playwright in the summer of 1916 in the quiet fishing village of Provincetown,Massachusetts where a group of youngwriters and painters had launched an experimental theatre and thus, resultingto his association with the group ‘Provincetown Players’ which later formed thePlaywrights’ Theatre in Greenwich Village. His one-act sea play entitled BoundEast for Cardiff was produced in a tiny, dilapidated playhouse on adockyard. Later that year, on November 3, 1916, Bound East for Cardiff and O’Neill debuted in New York as thegroup’s first big break. And for the next few years, his contributions elevatedthe group’s reputation.  O’Neillalso made a second attempt for love when he married Agnes Boulton, a fellowwriter, and the couple was blessed with two children, a son named Shane and adaughter named Oona. All his one-act sea plays, along with a number of hislesser efforts, and a few others were produced by the group in their theatresfrom the years 1916 to 1920. Hisfirst full-length play, Beyond the Horizon, was produced in the Morosco Theaterin Broadway in February 2, 1920.

It took the theatrical world by a storm as itharvested great compliments from the audiences and stunned the critics with itstragic realism that won O’Neill his very first Pulitzer Prize for Drama andbrought him to the attention of a wider theatre public – both in the UnitedStates and abroad.             Later that year, his first major hit, Emperor Jones, wasperformed in Broadway. The play made indirect reference to that year’sdebatable subject for the presidential election, the US occupation of Haiti.