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l1       CaseStudy Analysis of Whispering PinesJoshuaDankwa APA formatting.

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I have offered some suggested rewording which may help you to understand the expectation. Grade: 78% or 15.6         CBE 6010Logical and Critical AnalysisRegis University                           Abstract Thisl2  is a case study analysis ofWhispering Pines done by Lee McBride to assess the problems faced by thisorganization. Using McKinsey 7-S framework, it was discoveredthat, Whispering pines has certain problems when it came to way their organization is structured, thesystems in place were not effective, and the style of management were relaxed. Tobetter understand and propose solutions to these problems, Bloom’sTaxonomy of learning domains were used.Analysis of the Whispering Pines financial and business strategies showed, there were no specificsystems in place. Evaluations of the case analysis,showed some inconsistencies in information gathering. Lastly, a proposedscorecard system was introduced to measure performanceof Whispering Pines.

                      Strategicall3 Objectivesof Whispering Pines     Whispering Pine’s current goal is to getthe State to recognize their current building as a historic landmark. PerMcBrides’s investigations, the problems facing this organization is l4 greater than their pursuit of gettinga recognition for their building. Fromthe case study, there is no strategy that arel5  in place to assess the organization’sobjectives and goals. Moreover, “formulating strategies is a mechanism thatsenior management employs to assess thecompany’s strengths and weaknesses” (Dias Jordao & Casas Novas, 2013, p.

99). Per the article, Whispering Pines was founded to provide homes to membersof the Society of Friends (Joyner, Frantz, & Crane, 2012). However, they have deviated fromthat goall6 , and now admit anyone. This hasled to confusion as to whether Whispering Pines isclassified as either, a retirement home or a boarding house. The problemwith the confusion is attributed to state’s requirements for a home to be classified as a retirement homel7 l8  but the problem lies in theircommitment to their by-laws.

As Dias jordao& Casas Novas (2013) explains the three strategical plans company must follow, these include; time, frequency and effort. The time involvesthe short or long-term goals of the organization, the frequency is the howfrequent these strategies will occur, and thelastly l9 the effort from significant people ofthe organization (Dias Jordao & Casas Novas, 2013).  Structural Problems     In terms ofstructuring of Whispering Pines, the onlyknown communication is between, Gail Goodbroom who is the manager and MargeUpman, the board treasurer. The article mentioned the by-laws call for a 12l10 -member boardl11  but the current members are only 4l12 . Thisis another case of failure to stick to their organizational goals. Moreover, asDias jordao & Casas Novas (2013)asserts, it isimperative that organizations ensure frequentoccurrence of their strategies. In the case study, the by-law’s call for allboard members to be members of the Society of Friends, therefore, this has led to l13 constraints on number of board members (Joyner, et al., 2012).

The coordination between each department isnot structured to gain knowledge of how responsibilities are shared among memberl14 . From McBride’s analysis, he found thatl15 ,Gail Goodbroom oversees all day-to-day activities of Whispering Pines. Theseactivities included;l16 cooking, buying of groceries, collection of the rents,making deposits, and reconciling the bank statement (Joyner, et al., 2012). From this analysis, McBride noticesthere were nochecks and balances pertaining to thefinances of Whispering Pines.

The article further describes thatl17 ,the lines of communication were seasonal since Marge spent his vacation in warmweathers. These created difficulties in establishinga form of communication with him during the winters. Suggestion: Gail Goodbroom, the manager ofWhispering Pines, is sensitive to theneeds of the residents and knowledgeable about the operational aspects of thefacility. However, no written policies and procedures are in place foruniformity of activities or continuity of operation should an employee changebecome necessary. The board of directors is not clearly versed in the daily operational aspects of the facility.The manager makes unilateral decisions and has an undefined position ofauthority with imprecise accountability for her actions. Current Systems of Whispering Pines   Tim Hayden sought the help of Mr. McBridel18  and per his observation, Whispering Pines is losing money and currentlyrely on donations.

His statement is basedon mere observation without any solid facts. He confesses to having no backgroundin business thereby, limiting his ability to offer meaningful ideas to get theorganization on track. The monitoring and evaluationsof business isl19  non-existent at Whispering Pines. The only form of accountability iswhen Gail presents the total accounts to Marge (Joyner,et al., 2012). Moreover,Mcbride noticed, she didn’tl20  produce a detailed list ofmonthly rent payments from each resident, hence, no form of data storage.

Tl21 he ability to store and use data is importantfor many organizations. Thatis why per Dias jordao & Casas Novas(2013), it isimportant that organizations realize the need for adequate monitoring ofquantitative and qualitative data and its impact on financial performance. Fromthe article, Whispering Pine has not paid adequateattention to data gathering and its usage.

Tim Hayden has the ambition to seekoutside help to maintain the internal processes of Whispering Pinesl22  but he cannot afford to pay these specialists.Suggestion:Thesystems for both the board and thefacility staff of Whispering Pines were informal. There were no checks andbalances, no cash flow reporting, no detailed accounting ledgers for residents,no purchase receipts, and no defined calendar of facility permits. Mr. McBrideadvised new procedures for the receipt and expenditure of funds, which should be handled by different people and signed-offby third parties. Formal meeting agendas and minutes could include importantdates and accounting reviews.

 The Shared Values of Whispering Pines    McBride found thatl23 ,Whispering Pines was originally foundedas a non-profit religious groupl24  but there were indicators ofany religious activitiesl25 . From the article, an inference can bemade that, Whispering Pines does not have an organizational culture towhich all employees are accustomed to. l26 Theby-laws call for board members to be friends but not residents do not have tobe friends (l27 Joyner, et al., 2012). Using the McKinsey framework, there is no team culture since eachdepartment has their own cultural values.Suggestion:Whispering Pines formed as a religious nonprofit to provide retirement livingto members of the Quaker Society of Friends.  The by-laws called for a board of 12 membersand required each to be an active Society member. The board was unable torecruit new members due to this requirementand the four existing members did not qualify as a quorum.

Society requirementsfor residents had relaxed over time, which resulted in a property full ofunaffiliated enrollees. In addition, theboard’s focus on the property’s historic landmark status was not aligned withthe shared values to provideretirement living. Migration from the original mission caused confusion and represented a danger to tax-exempt status.Style of Operation    The management employs a passive style of management since as Mcbride noted, there are no forms ofchecks and balances in their financial reports. The daily operations ofWhispering Pines fall on Gail Goodbroom, with little support from themanagement. The leaders of Whispering Pines do not have the necessary skills tomanage the organizations, evidently as seen in Tim Hayden’s lack of businessknowledge.

Moreover, as Harrington & Miles (1996, P. 165) put it,”Peoplesvalues tend to fall into two maincategories. The first comprises an organization’sshared values about how people shouldwork together- for instance, whether it encourages people to work alone orvalues joint effort in teams. The secondcategory consists of values concerning the primary motivation for effort: doesthe organization believe people are motivated mainly by competition and reward,or by some noble purpose?l28 The above factors forensuring team togetherness are missing in Whispering Pines per the article. Example Theboard style was noted as permissive andprotective of the status quo. One board member described his involvementas honorary, mostly due to obligation. In orderto effect meaningful change, Mr.McBride advised that the board would need to revisit its fiduciary and legalresponsibilities for proper organizational functioning and redefine a moreproactive and accountable leadership style.

 The of Staff of Whispering l29 Pines    Per the article, the staff of WhisperingPines are mostly part-timers while Gail the manager worked full time from 7:00am to 3:00 pm Monday through Friday. Theonly well-defined position is the managerial position which begs the question,what form structure does Whispering Pines have? This organization desperatelyneeds to hire someone who will oversee booking, while Gail can concentrate onmanaging the internal and external operations of the organization.  Hiring processes can be tedious especiallywhen companies are looking for people who possess the values they are looking for. Per Harrington & Miles (1996, P. 164),”successful companies in different industries have formulated quite distinctive sets of people values that works for them. They use carefully designedprocesses to recruit people who fit theirvalues”.

The task of hiring workers who are also members of the Society ofFriends can pose an obstacle to achieving the above goal.Suggestion:The staff consisted of Gail Goodbroom, House Manager, and up to sixpart-time employees. The qualifications of the staff were not clarified.Similarly, board credentials were not detailed,but involved architecture and general membership in the Society ofFriends.

In both areas, Mr. McBride suggested theclarification of roles and underscored the need for financial,managerial, medical, social work, and/orgeriatric expertiseCurrent Skills ofWhispering Pines   From analysisof the article, thereis limited skill set around theWhispering Pines organization. Tim Haynes and Gail Goodbroom who are motivatedto cause changes in the organization lacks the basic business concepts, such asdepreciation.

l30  Analysis, Evaluation, and Suggestions for Whispering Pines       Firstly, I wasgained knowledge l31 from this case study by reading the article and synthesizing the ideasfrom the McKinsey 7-s framework. The framework provided the basis for in-depth analysisof Whispering Pines. This enabled meto assess the elements of a successful organization by evaluating which metricsare missing in Whispering Pines case analysis. Lastly, ti enabledme to draw aconclusion l32 onthe importance of these elements in a successful business organization.     From the case study, Mr. McBride performed analysisonl33  the current situation of Whispering pines by assessing their objectives,daily operations, and financial situations.

His analysis was mostly based on questioning the structureof Whispering Pines especially the limited number of board of directors. His analysis also incorporated an inductive from of argument l34 as seen in Joyner, et al. (2012, p. 62), l35 “With the tax authorities clamping down on non-profitswho claim to be religious groups but do not demonstrate that fact through theiroperations, this issue should be of some concern to the board. Youmay lose your preferred tax status”. Theevaluation of ideas was manifested throughMcBride’s assessment of Whispering Pine’s financial problems.

Prior to makinga conclusion on the factors that contributed to their financialproblems, he collected their booklet on their by-laws to study the organization’sprocesses. The evaluations of the by-laws yielded results which showed; lack of strategy, l36 structure, and limited staff at the Whispering Pines. McBride providedthe necessary assessment of the financial problemsl37  but he could have assessed the various evaluations methods employed byWhispering Pines. For examplel38  as jordao & Casas Novas (2013,p. 99) , explains, “the concept ofperformance evaluation and control triesto align the traditional financial perspective to three other ones linked tocustomer satisfaction, improvement of internal processes and learning andgrowth of employees”.

McBride could haveassessed these three elements to better understandhow Whispering Pines evaluate their overall processes. Creation of a better internal processes at l39 Whispering Pines is imperative to getting the organizations on track. Thismeans Whispering Pinesneed to put place a scorecard l40 system to measure these three metrics.                        ReferencesClark, D. (n.d.). Bloom’s Taxonomy ofLearning Domains.

Retrieved September 17, 2017, from                                                        http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/bloom.html Dias Jordão, R.V., & Casas Novas, J.

L. (2013). AStudy on the Use of the Balanced Scorecard for         Strategy  Implementation in a  Large Brazilian Mixed Economy Company.

Journal Of Technology Management & Innovation, 8(3), 98-107.l41  Fleisher,  C.S.

, & Bensoussan, B.E. (2007).

Business and competitive analysis:Effective                                      applicationof new and classic methods. UpperSaddle River, NJ: Pearson Education Inc  Harrington, D., &Miles, H. (1996). Putting people values to work.Mckinsey Quarterly, (3), 163-167.  Joyner, F. F.

, Frantz, D., & Crane, R. (2012). A CONSULTANT’S DREAM OR NIGHTMARE?.Journal                                                    Of Case Studies, 30(1), 58-64.l42 TheMcKinsey 7-S Framework: Ensuring That All Parts of Your Organization Work in Harmony.(n.d.

).       Retrieved September 17, 2017, from            https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newSTR_91.html43                            l1Incorrectfont and font size on heading. l2Unclearantecedent. Subsequent UAs will be highlighted.

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