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Mike Mazmanyan
Intro
I. Intro
A. Attention Getter: What helps cure depression and stress, builds self-esteem, boosts brain power, improves sleeping patterns, prevents colds and has anti-aging effects but isn’t medicine? Your favorite exercise does, and in my case Basketball.
B. Revealed Object: This is a basketball, you’ve probably all seen one before. And according to SFIA.com, there’s a ¼ chance you’ve used one before.
C. Social Significance: Living in a such a busy world like the one we live in today, we mostly think about school, work, and other life obligations. It’s very easy for us to forget to take a step back and think about ourselves, and exercise is the perfect thing to help you focus on making a better and more productive you.
D. Thesis: By learning more about the basketball culture hopefully you will see that it is more than just a sport or pastime.
E. Preview of Main Points: First I will talk about this ball and some brief history of basketball, then I’ll talk about how this ball represents the basketball culture and lastly, why I identify with the beautiful basketball culture.
Transition: First let’s bounce to the history of basketball and the ball itself.
II. Body

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A. Object
Dr. James Naismith was challenged to invent a new indoor game that would keep athletes busy and fit during the winter; so he invented basketball in December of 1891 in Springfield, Massachusetts. The very first official basketball match was on January 20 of 1892. Can anyone guess how many combined points were scored the whole game? Only 1 point was scored the entire match. Probably because they used peach baskets for the hoops; the bottom was closed off so they literally had to use a ladder to climb up and get the balls out. Open bottom metal hoops did not come for another TEN YEARS, why they didn’t do it earlier is beyond me. The first balls were smaller and had a football grip on it. The basketballs used in the NBA today are 29.5 inches around, weigh 22 ounces and have about 35,000 of these little bumps on them. 

Culture Object Represents

Transition: Now let’s slide about how this ball represents the Basketball Culture. 
According to the Sports and Fitness Association, Basketball is the most played sport in the U.S with over 26 million participants. What is the first thing someone needs to play BasketBALL? A basketball. Similar to how you need a pen to write, the first thing you need to play basketball is a ball. Though there are other aspects in the game of basketball like defense, jumping and running, none of those will win you any games unless you use this ball to score points. Ways to play basketball include casual shootarounds by yourself, pick-up games, a school or college team, or any other organized league. Basketball is very welcoming to people of all ages, genders and races, and not even a language barrier can get in the way communication once you step on the court. Unlike other sports that are less accessible, there are always basketball games you can join at your local gym or rec center.

Transition: Now that we’ve talked about how this ball represents the Basketball culture, let’s jump into why I identify with this culture. 

Why I identify with this Culture

Preparing for this speech I had to ask my mom how long I’ve been playing basketball because it goes back as far as I can even remember. And sure enough she told me that I was always crawling around on the ground playing with my little orange ball as a baby. I was born in Glendale but moved to Portland, Oregon at the age of 5. At that age I barely spoke English and moving to a prominently white city I had a really hard time fitting in and making friends. So basketball became my best friend, it became my escape because it was always there for me, never made fun of me, I didn’t have to fit in and I could play whenever I wanted. Playing basketball has taught me much more than how to score a basket or play defense. It’s helped me grow as a person, improved my concentration, helped me develop self-discipline and has taught me how to be a leader.

III. Conclusion

Signal to Close: In conclusion, now you have a better understanding of where basketball comes from and the culture it represents.
Review Thesis: Now that you’ve learned about the culture, hopefully you can see why it is the most played sport in America.

C. Review Main Points: First we talked about some history of basketball, second, how the ball represents the exercise culture and lastly, why I identify with basketball and the exercise culture.
D. Closer: What do you see when you look at a basketball? You probably see an orange ball with black lines and some leather. But a basketball to me represents my passion, my sweat, my tears, my sacrifice, and a sense of belonging. Basketball has come a long way from being just a YMCA game played in the winter, now teams are being valued at over 2 billion dollars. Basketball is a sport I’m very passionate about, find your favorite and try your best to work out even just a little bit every day and witness your quality of life get better with more energy and a more positive outlook on life.