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Change management is an significant process of project management which can lead the whole team to prepare and go through the change happened during the project. While all changes are unique for each member in the project team, we need to have a sufficient structured plan for the whole team moving to their future stage from their current situation.

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5.3.2 Change Control Flow

In the processing of project, plenty of change situations may happen. For the internal change, the project team might meet the reassignment of staff. For the external change, the team may receive a negative feedback from professor or clients which requires the changing of the project content or procedure. When meeting these situations, the team can never assume that everyone knows why this change is needed. It is necessary for the project manager to let  stakeholders and every team member have a clear understanding of why the change is needed and how this will improve the performance or results of the project. Therefore, when the team are going through a change, we need to strictly base on the change request(CR) flow which is shown in form 5.1. 

Step

Description

Generate CR

A submitter completes a CR Form and sends the completed form to the Change Manager

Log CR Status

The Change Manager enters the CR into the CR Log. The CR’s status is updated throughout the CR process as needed.

Evaluate CR

Project personnel review the CR and provide an estimated level of effort to process, and develop a proposed solution for the suggested change

Authorize

Approval to move forward with incorporating the suggested change into the project/product

Implement

If approved, make the necessary adjustments to carry out the requested change and communicate CR status to the submitter and other stakeholders

Form 5.1. Change Request Flow

For each change request, the project manager should evaluate and prioritize it. First, assign the change request to a qualitative level, such as high, medium and low. This step will help project manager to arrange the change plan schedule when there are several of changes during the same period. Then, defining the type of the change by its scope, time, duration, resources, deliverables, processes and quality. Classification step is to make sure that the manager can customize the change plan directly and accurately. During the change, establishing a well-communicated and achievable milestone is necessary. According to Marcotte, an expert of change management, 70% of changes fail because people believe that results relative to the effort aren’t worth it, or aren’t working. After evaluating its significance and making the change plan, the state of each change request need to be assigned, e.g. open, work in progress, testing and closed.
After the change control flow, the final results of it should be that everyone in the team can keep up with change quickly and efficiently. Also, the whole team will be able to respond for every kind of change swiftly.A risk is an event or condition that, if occurs, could have a positive or negative effect on a project’s objectives. Therefore, Risk Management is the vital process of identifying, assessing, responding to, monitoring, and reporting risks. In this section, Risk Management Plan defines how risks associated with the TWF project will be identified, analyzed, and managed.

RISK MANAGEMENT PROCEDURE

The project manager working with the project team and project sponsors will ensure that risks are actively detected, analyzed, and controlled throughout the life of the project. Risks will be identified as early as possible in the project to minimize their impact via constantly reviewing and reflecting by project team.The steps for accomplishing this are outlined in the following sections. The project manager, Sudesh Gabale, will undertake the majority of the tasks of the Risk Manager for this project.

RISK IDENTIFICATION

Risk identification section will involve related personnel including the project team, appropriate stakeholders. It will contain an evaluation of environmental factors, organizational culture and the project management plan. Careful attention will be given to the project deliverables, assumptions, constraints, work breakdown structure (WBS), cost/effort estimates, resource plan, and other key project documents.

RISK ANALYSIS

All risks identified will be assessed to identify the range of possible project outcomes. Qualification will be used to determine which risks are the top risks to pursue and respond to and which risks can be ignored.11.4.1 Qualitative Risk AnalysisThe probability and impact of occurrence for each identified risk will be assessed by the project manager, with input from the project team using the following approach:ProbabilityThe percentage of occurrence of a certain event. Usually an event with 70% of occurrence can be defined as high probability.ImpactThis factor identifies the extent the event could affect the whole project. Usually a high risk means that it has the potential to greatly impact project cost, project schedule or performancePerformanceRisks that fall within either high probability or high impact will have risk response planning which may include both a risk mitigation and a risk contingency plan.11.4.2 Quantitative Risk AnalysisAnalysis of risk events that have been prioritized using the qualitative risk analysis process and their effect on project activities will be estimated, a numerical rating applied to each risk based on this analysis, and then documented in this section of the risk management plan.

RISK RESPONSE PLANNING

Each major risk will be assigned to a project team member for monitoring purposes to ensure that the risk will not “fall through the cracks”.For each major risk, one of the following approaches will be selected to address it:· Avoid – eliminate the threat by eliminating the cause· Mitigate – Identify ways to reduce the probability or the impact of the risk· Accept – Nothing will be doneFor each risk that will be mitigated, the project team will identify ways to prevent the risk from occurring or reduce its impact or probability of occurring. This may include prototyping, adding tasks to the project schedule, adding resources, etc.For each major risk that is to be mitigated or that is accepted, a course of action will be outlined for the event that the risk does materialize in order to minimize its impact.

RISK MONITORING, CONTROLLING, AND REPORTING

The level of risk on a project will be tracked, monitored and reported throughout the project lifecycle.

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The most noticeable events will be maintained by the project team and will be kept as part of the project status reporting process for this project.